Solar System: Evidence of life not yet found on Venus, scientists are looking for possibility

Solar System In this study model, it was seen that there is an abundance of sulfur dioxide (SOTu) in the atmosphere of Venus. However, sulfur dioxide in the Earth’s atmosphere comes from volcanic emissions. On Venus, sulfur dioxide is present in high amounts in the lower clouds.

Washington, Agency. Scientists engaged in exploring the possibility of life on other planets, including Mars, are constantly researching. A new study has found that the unusual behavior of sulfur in the atmosphere of Venus reduces the chances of life. According to news agency ANI, researchers from the University of Cambridge used a combination of biochemistry and atmospheric chemistry to test the hypothesis of life in the clouds.

Astronomers have speculated for decades and found no evidence of life in the composition of Venus’s atmosphere. Many chemical elements are needed for the existence of life. In the activity of life, food is consumed and waste is taken out. But no evidence was found about it.

In the report published in the journal Nature Communications, scientists said that although no traces of life have been found on the planet Venus, this study could be useful in studying the atmospheres of similar planets in the galaxy and detecting life outside our solar system.

Dr. Pal Rimmer said-
Dr. Paul Rimmer, associated with Cambridge University’s Department of Earth Sciences and co-author of the research, says that we studied the atmosphere of Venus continuously for about two years. The team spent a lot of time understanding the sulfur chemistry visible in the clouds here. On the basis of many facts, the scientists were busy in investigating how much is the possibility here. Given the known sources of chemical energy in the atmosphere of Venus, the researchers used a combination of biochemistry and atmospheric chemistry to study the chemical reaction.

Sean Jordan said-
Sean Jordan of Cambridge’s Institute of Astronomy said that we looked at the sulfur-based food available in the atmosphere of Venus. It is not something one would want to eat, but it is the main source of energy available on the planet. Food is essential for life. In this context, the study tried to see what is changing in specific chemicals.

In this study model, it was observed that there is an abundance of sulfur dioxide (SOTu) in the atmosphere of Venus. However, sulfur dioxide in the Earth’s atmosphere comes from volcanic emissions. On Venus, sulfur dioxide is present in high amounts in the lower clouds. It decreases at higher altitudes. If life exists, it is affecting atmospheric chemistry, says co-author Dr. Oliver Schirtle, from Cambridge’s Department of Earth Sciences and the Institute of Astronomy. The reason for the low amount of sulfur dioxide on the planet Venus is not life itself.

The model developed by Jordan includes a list of metabolic reactions that help life forms make their own food and create waste. Scientists used this model to understand whether SOTU is reduced by metabolic reactions. It was found that this method can bring down the level of SO2. But this would require the production of much larger quantities of other molecules.

Jordan says that we wanted to try to understand the chemical reactions to find the possibility of life on Venus. In this direction, the Hubble telescope’s successor, JWST, will help further in-depth studies when it begins to image other planetary systems by the end of this year. In the present study, it is possible to see the sulfur molecules present on the planet from JWST. Therefore, it can help scientists to understand the chemical behavior of other planets outside the solar system. Shartle says that to understand why some planets are alive, it is important to know why other planets are dead. If life somehow manages to penetrate Venus’s clouds, it will completely change how we search for chemical signals on other planets. Scientists say this is just the beginning. Continuous research is needed in this direction.

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